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MEXICO - GUERRERO

12 – 17 January 2005

by Rick Schaefer (Overview & Bird List) and
Jesse Fagan (Daily Itinerary Details)

 

Observers: Rick Schaefer, Craig Rudolph, Jesse Fagan, and Charles D. Fisher.

Dates: 12 – 17 January 2005.  The 12th was primarily a travel day with only a couple of brief stops en route to Atoyac.  We birded until about 11:00 am on the 17th prior to our flight home.

Trip Overview 

We spent three days birding in the Sierra Madre del Sur above Acapulco.  One day was devoted to the wetter Pacific slope above the town of Atoyac where we got up to an elevation of about 6,500 feet.  The road up from Atoyac is well-paved as far as Paraiso.  Afterwards, it was very slow going in many places in our Volkswagon Jetta.  A high-clearance vehicle would certainly have gotten us up the mountain quicker, allowing for more birding time.  Two days were spent along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road on the interior slope of the sierra.  This road was great for a couple of reasons if you can ignore the garbage strewn along much of the lower section.  Firstly, the road is well-paved all the way to Filo de Caballo where it turns to dirt.  Afterwards, it was easily driven (at least when we were there during the dry season) in our small car at least to the site of the small abandoned lumber camp (this is as far as we went) mentioned in Howell’s bird-finding guide.  Secondly, this road traverses a variety of habitats ranging from arid thorn scrub of the Balsas River drainage up to humid oak-conifer forest at around 8,000 feet (again, this is as far as we went). 

Our final one and a half days were devoted to birding patches of lowland forest and scrub near sea level in Ixtapa.  Most of our time here was spent at Aztlan Parque Ecologico. There are a number of Mexican specialties to be found in the areas we visited, especially in the mountains.  However, the primary purpose of this trip was to observe the White-throated Jay, and we were successful in doing so on the interior slope of the sierra.  Two hummingbirds, Short-crested Coquette and White-tailed Hummingbird, are also highly sought species found on the sierra’s Pacific slope.  The latter was fairly common at higher elevations above Paraiso.  Howell’s Mexican field guide indicates the coquette is suspected to breed at much higher elevations at this time of year.  Thus, I was a bit pessimistic about our chances of finding the coquette at the lower elevation sites where others have reported seeing them at different times of year.  Flowering Inga trees were abundant in the San Vicente-Paraiso area.  However, despite searching a number of these trees, we were not able to locate a Short-crested Coquette.  Admittedly, we did not put a tremendous amount of effort into it since we wanted to reach the higher elevations in an effort to find the jay.  In hindsight, perhaps we should have concentrated on searching for the coquette while on the Pacific side.  The jay is probably more reliably found above Filo de Caballo on the interior slope based on past trip reports as well as our own experience.

Past trip reports mention a heavy military and federal police presence in the mountains above Atoyac and along the upper Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.  Apparently, drug trafficking and armed robbery have been problems in these areas (at least at times), thereby prompting such a security presence.  During our visit, we noticed quite a number of federal police in the Atoyac area.  Elsewhere, the security presence was quite light.  We encountered two military checkpoints during the entire trip.  One was just above Paraiso, and the other was in the lowlands at the intersection of Route 200 and old Route 95.  Everyone we met, both security personnel and locals, were very friendly and we never felt threatened in any way.  Nevertheless, one should take the same precautions they would on any trip to remote areas.  I had a great time in Guerrero and plan to some day return for the Short-crested Coquette. 

Birding Localities

 

Pacific lowlands from Ixtapa to Acapulco, Jan. 12 and 16-17.  Habitats at or near sea level, including dry forest and scrub, mangrove-lined waterways, coconut groves, beaches, rocky coastlines, and urban areas.  Most of these areas were at Ixtapa where we spent much of our time at Aztlan Parque Ecologico during Jan.16 and 17.

 

Sierra Madre del Sur, Pacific slope, Jan. 13.  Atoyac-Paraiso Road up to approx. 6,500 ft./1,950 m in elevation.  This is the wetter side of the mountains, but we had no rain the day we birded it.  The road is well-paved up to the town of Paraiso and then turns to dirt and rock.  This road is very slow going in many places and a high-clearance vehicle would be preferable to save time.

 

Sierra Madre del Sur, interior slope, Jan. 14-15.  Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.  This is a great birding road which traverses a good variety of montane vegetational zones.  We birded in arid Balsas thorn scrub at elevations of 3,000 ft./900 m and 4,300 ft./1,290 m, arid oak-thorn scrub at 5,200 ft./1,560 m and 6,000 ft./1,800 m (little time spent here), dry pine-oak forest at 7,000 ft./2,100 m (very little time spent here one afternoon), and humid oak-conifer forest at 8,000 ft./2,400 m.


Daily Itinerary Details (by Jesse Fagan)

 

Day 1, 1/12/05:


We took a direct flight with Continental from Houston Bush Intercontinental into Zihuatanejo/Ixtapa.  We rented a VW Jetta from Hertz at the airport.  If you plan on birding the forest above Paraiso, then I strongly suggest getting a vehicle with at least high-clearance.  I’m not sure 4-WD is necessary, but it wouldn’t hurt.  In addition, there are no cambios or banks at the airport (that we could find), so it is necessary to drive into Zihuantanejo or Ixtapa in order to exchange money.  It may be best to exchange money in the states (at least enough for a few days), but, if not, both towns are easy enough navigate. 


After exchanging money in Zihuatenejo, we headed out of town on HW 200 towards Acapulco [sign said 240 KM].  The road is two-lane and paved, but slow going with small towns and many topes.  The turnoff to Atoyac is well-marked and from Zihuatanejo it took us about 2.5 hours (with only a few short stops).  Habitat along the way is pretty degraded with large-scale mango and coconut plantations, scattered trees and hedgerows, and cattle grazing.  We did stop at an impressive mirador over looking the Pacific Ocean. 

 

Atoyac is a bustling little town (60,000 habitants!).  There is one road in and one road out with several one-way streets connecting the two major parallel roads.  To reach the town square and the cathedral, continue driving into town until you come to a dead end and you will be forced right and then left around the square.  If you get lost, simply ask someone how to get to the cathedral e.g. ΏDonde esta el catedral?  The cathedral is pretty ugly; mainly white with an aqua blue/green trim.  We stayed at the Hotel Catedral; adjacent to the town square and around the corner from the cathedral (on the road leading out of town)  It is a basic hotel, but clean with warm water and air-conditioning (clima, if you want it).  Doubles were about 330 pesos or $30 a night.  You could bargain a bit if you like, but it seemed fair. 


Map of


There is limited and protected parking below the hotel, but it may be a hassle to get your car out if you are leaving early in the morning.  We did this the first night, but the second night we simply left the vehicle on the street with no problems.  There are few options for dinner.  We asked the little boy at the hotel what he recommended.  He suggested the Restaurante Mexicano (go figure?!).  It was about 5 blocks down the road (leaving town) from the hotel.  We walked down there (sure enough that is the name) the first night and enjoyed a nice Mexican meal with a few cold beers.  Prices here were very reasonable.

 

Day 2, 1/13/05:


We had no idea how to find the road up to Paraiso from Atoyac.  We knew from trip reports that we needed to head northeast out of town.  From the hotel you will need to head south out of town, but quickly cut across to the road leading north towards the square.  Again, heading north you will eventually be forced to turn right, but this time continue straight until you come to the next paved road to the left.  This road should get you headed in the right direction out of town.  Unfortunately, we drove this section in the dark (early morning and evening) so I don’t recall the exact directions.  The road up to Paraiso is two-lane, paved, with curves.  As you come into the town of Paraiso you will notice that most of the town is down to your right and eventually the road forks becoming unpaved in both directions.  Zero your trip odometer at this point.  Take the left fork and you quickly (.3 KM) cross a bridge.  The road for the next 2 KM is pretty bad and skirts the town.  At 2 KM, you reach the semi-permanent military roadblock.  Our experiences with the roadblock were good and we were quickly on our way. 


At KM 18-21 we encountered many flowing Inga trees.  Continue checking for these trees as you climb.  This road in places was terrible and on at least two occasions, we were forced to get out and walk to give ourselves more clearance.  You can expect to take 4-5 hours to reach the higher-elevation cloud forest from Paraiso (this includes birding stops).  Eventually, around KM 25, the road became much better and you could easily make good time to the other side.  We made it as far as KM 39 above Paraiso before turning back.  Unfortunately, the long drive back down meant we were driving the last 2 hours or so in the dark.  We didn’t get back to Atoyac until 8 PM.  Not an ideal sitiuation.  Personally, based on my knowledge of the area and trip reports I have read, I would not bother trying to get up into the higher elevations on this side.  Unless, you plan on camping or driving all the way over to Filo de Caballo, the higher elevations are simply too hard to bird (not enough time) while basing yourself out of Atoyac.  I would simply focus on the mid-elevations and looking for the coquette and other species.  This can be accomplished anywhere from KM 10-21 (however, recall Howell does allude to the idea the coquettes move higher up in the winter >1500 m).

 

Day 3, 1/14/05:


We left Atoyac very early around 5 AM.  Our plan was to make the long loop trip through Acapulco, Chilpancingo, to the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo road.  We headed down the coast along HW 200 where we encountered another military roadblock at the junction of old HW 95 and 200.  We passed easily through with little delay.  We headed inland on old HW 95 (avoiding the outskirts of Acapulco) and met up with the cuota HW 95 (toll road) just north of Acapulco.  This is a very expensive road.  It cost us 200 pesos (about $20) to travel one way to Chilpancingo  You make two separate payments of 100 pesos; one as you enter the toll road above Acapulco and another just south of Chilpancingo.  The road passes through what appears to be undisturbed lowland scrub-thorn forest.  Pretty country, but, unfortunately, there is nowhere to pull off on the toll road. 


When you enter the outskirts of Chilpancingo you will be back on the old HW 95.  Be careful as you exit on the northside b/c you will need to take a right turn towards Milpillas/Iguala that then crosses back over the road towards the left.  If you miss this turn, it forces you to travel to Mexico City via the cuota HW 95.  It is about 20 KM until the next turn around to correct the mistake (total of 40 KM out of your way).  We made this mistake, so pay attention as you exit Chilpancingo.  I don’t suggest taking the old HW 95 from HW 200 all the way to Milpillas.  It can be arduous with slow moving trucks and winding roads and take twice as long as the toll road. 


Many trip reports have suggested basing yourself in Chilpancingo in order to bird Milpillas-Filo de Caballo road.  This is fine, but there is lodging closer to the turnoff.  We found a decent place called Hotel Cactus in Zumpango (about 250 pesos a night for a double and fan; bargain if you like) just off HW 95 on the leftside (heading north).  A Pemex station is close by and there is a good restaurant on the northside of Zumpango called “El Buho.”  They serve iguana and our group asked to see how they were kept prior to being served (we were simply curious).  It is an unnerving site.  The live iguanas are bound and held in a back room prior to being killed and prepared.  They were not Green Iguanas, but a smaller species of native iguana that the owner said they trap in the surrounding canyons.  DO NOT ORDER THE IGUANA.       

 

The turnoff to the town of Filo de Caballo is well marked; set your odometer to zero at this point.  The first 10 km or so are through good Balsas scrub.  At KM 3.6 there is a turnoff onto a dirt road that wanders down the hill.  Park here in the early morning and walk down listening/playing tape for Balsas Screech-Owl.  As the sun rises, you can begin birding for other species.  There are other frequent pullouts up the hill (but this last one was especially good and without litter).  The paved road climbs in elevation through a transition of habitat: arid Balsas scrub, scrub-oak, oak-pine, and at the higher-elevations a mixed humid forest.  The road is thankfully paved all the way to Filo de Caballo. 


At Filo the road becomes dirt, stay left through this town until you come to another small town, Carrizal de los Bravo.  Turn right and continue up the mountain.  In 2 KM or so, there will be a noticeable fork in the road.  This is the infamous junction: the road to the left leads to your doom (well, it is not advised to go this way; this is the road that eventually leads back towards Chilpancingo but first passes through the town of Omiltemi for which the White-throated Jay was formally named) and you will want to turn right at this junction.  After only about .5 KM or so you will see a clearing on the left.  We parked here and hiked a cattle trail leading up the backside of the ridge.  At the top is another clearing and the trail continues back down.  It is here that we found a large mixed flock and a pair of White-throated Jays.  We birded this area for the rest of the afternoon. 

 

Day 4, 1/15/05:  


Up early and headed for the Balsas scrub to look for the screech-owl.  If you stay in Zumpango, then you can be in Balsas habitat within 20 minutes.  We stopped at several different places and only managed to get one bird calling in response to our tape.  It never did seem very interested.  There is plenty of good habitat in this area, so I don’t think it is necessary to play the tape only at KM 1-2 (Howell states this is a good place).  In fact, this would eventually put a lot of strain on the bird that lived in that area.  Move around and find a spot, as stated, the habitat is extensive for the first 10 KM.  There are good stops at KM 1.5 (deep gorge), 3.6 (nice road for walking), 5.8, and 7.0. 


We birded the various habitats all morning back up to the humid forest above Filo de Caballo.  We stayed in this vicinity for 2 hours before heading back down the mountain and making the long drive to Zihuatanejo.  The drive retraced the exact route we took from Atoyac.  Just outside of Petatlan on HW 200 we stopped at an open air restaurant called “El Ranchito de Magarita.”  We highly recommend this place.  The owner and servers were all very friendly and the food was delicious.  The drive from Filo de Caballo to Zihuatanejo is about 6.5 hours (including a few small stops).  We didn’t find a hotel until 11 PM or so.  However, we do highly recommend the Hotel Aeropuerto (2 beds w/ clima = 300 pesos) w/ large Pemex across the street.  It is located near the airport on HW 200 and outside of the hustle and bustle of Zihuatanejo and Ixtapa.  We stayed here two nights.

 

Day 5, 1/16/05:  


We wanted to do a bit of birding in the lowlands around Ixtapa.  We left the hotel around 6 AM and made the short, 15-minute drive to Ixtapa.  Ixtapa is surprisingly very easy to navigate.  We were simply looking for “forest patches” as described in other trip reports.  However, we found something much better.  There is a new(?) ecological park on the northwest side of town run by FONATUR and called Aztlan Parque Ecologico.  As you enter Ixtapa continue moving northwest towards Playa Linda.  As you drive north, you will start to see signs for the park on your right and notice decent arid-scrub habitat.  It will not be too long before you see on your left a blue sign advertising a boat launch and parking (E). 


On the right and across the street will be a pond and a wide, brick-red bike path leading into the scrub.  This is the entrance to the reserve.  Park down at the boat ramp, but do a good job of keeping your car out of the way.  Walk across the street and bird the bike path and various other small trails that lead into the scrub and mangrove forest.  The paved bike trail is about 2.5 miles, but combine this with the other side trails and you can easily spend 1.5 days birding here.    It is a good idea to get an early start since the temps rapidly increase by mid-morning.  We spent all day birding this area with only a few stops in town looking for other forest patches.

 

Ixtapa is very Amercanized (in fact, did I see a Mexican in Ixtapa?).  I don’t recommend eating or sleeping in this place.  God, it just makes you think what it used to look like before the hotels and tacky restaurants.  It is also very expensive.  Stay at the Hotel Aeropuerto or in Zihautanejo (less Amercanized) and just bird the reserve in Ixtapa.  Support the local economy not the U.S. economy in Mexico. 

 

Day 6, 1/17/05:  


We had a mid-afternoon flight back to Houston so we spent all morning back at the reserve in Ixtapa.  Dropped the car off at the airport around 2 PM and made our flight back to the states. 


 

BIRD LIST by Rick Schaefer

 

Common and scientific names are taken from the most up-to-date A.O.U. check-list.

No. of species: 234

 

* = lifer for Rick (total = 18).

# = introduced by humans.

H = heard (I heard, but did not see the species).

G = glimpsed (I did not see well enough to identify, but identified by others).

X = not seen or heard by me.

Species in bold-type are Mexican endemics.

 

ANATIDAE

 

  1. Black-bellied Whistling-Duck (Dendrocygna autumnalis) – 350+ in a mangrove

      pond at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

        2. Blue-winged Teal (Anas discors) – 31 in mangrove ponds at Aztlan Parque

      Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

CRACIDAE

 

*      3. West Mexican Chachalaca (Ortalis poliocephala) – Heard in dry scrub along the

      lower Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road;  14 seen or heard in lowland dry forest at

      Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

SULIDAE

 

  4. Brown Booby (Sula leucogaster) – 15 seen flying around some offshore rocks at

      Ixtapa.

 

PELECANIDAE

 

  5. Brown Pelican (Pelecanus occidentalis) – Approx.15 seen at an ocean overlook

      between Zihautanejo and Acapulco;  about 75 seen from a beach at Ixtapa.

 

PHALACROCORACIDAE

 

  6. Neotropic Cormorant (Phalacrocorax brasilianus) – Approx.15 seen in wetlands

      at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

FREGATIDAE

 

  7. Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) – Common along the Pacific

      coastline.

 

ARDEIDAE

 

  8. Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) – 1 seen at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

  9. Great Egret (Ardea alba) – 7 seen in the Pacific lowlands;  1 seen at a small

      reservoir in the town of Xochipala on the lower Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road;

            Approx. 30 were seen flying, presumably from a roost, at dawn at Aztlan Parque

            Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

      10. Snowy Egret (Egretta thula) – 11 seen in the Pacific lowlands.

 

      11. Little Blue Heron (Egretta caerulea) – 5 seen at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in

            Ixtapa.

 

      12. Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis) – 150+ in Pacific lowlands;  1 seen in a pasture along

            the Atoyac-Paraiso road;  1 seen at a small reservoir in the town of Xochipala on

            the lower Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

      13. Green Heron (Butorides virescens) – 4 seen in mangrove wetlands at Aztlan

            Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

      14. Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax) – 5 seen in wetlands at

            Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

      15. Boat-billed Heron (Cochlearius cochlearius) – 1 seen in mangroves at Aztlan

            Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

THRESKIORNITHIDAE

 

      16. White Ibis (Eudocimus albus) – 9 seen in Pacific lowlands (7 at Aztlan Parque

            Ecologico in Ixtapa).

 

      17. White-faced Ibis (Plegadis chihi) – 53 seen in Pacific lowlands (3 at Aztlan

            Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa).

 

      18. Roseate Spoonbill (Platalea ajaja) – 11 seen in wetlands at Aztlan Parque

            Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

CICONIIDAE

 

      19. Wood Stork (Mycteria americana) – 4 seen at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

CATHARTIDAE

 

      20. Black Vulture (Coragyps atratus) – Very common in the Pacific lowlands and

            fairly common in the mountains.

 

      21. Turkey Vulture (Cathartes aura) – Abundant in the Pacific lowlands and common

            in the mountains.

 

ACCIPITRIDAE

 

      22. Osprey ( Pandion haliaetus) – 1 seen at Ixtapa.

 

      23. Sharp-shinned Hawk (Accipiter striatus) – 1 seen along the lower Milpillas-Filo

            de Caballo Road;  1 seen by others at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

      24. Cooper’s Hawk (Accipiter cooperi) – 1 seen on Pacific slope above Atoyac;

            1 seen in dry pine-oak forest along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road;  1 seen in

            Ixtapa.

 

X   25. Gray Hawk (Asturina nitida) – 4 seen by others in Pacific lowlands.

 

      26. Roadside Hawk (Buteo magnirostris) – 7 seen in Pacific lowlands;  1 seen in

            mountains above Atoyac.

 

      27. Short-tailed Hawk (Buteo brachyurus) – 2 seen in Pacific lowlands including 1

            dark morph at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa;  1 seen in mountains above

            Atoyac.

 

      28. Zone-tailed Hawk (Buteo albonotatus) - 1 seen at Ixtapa.

 

      29. Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis) – 1 (possibly 2) seen flying over humid

            oak-conifer forest above Filo de Caballo at 8,000 ft.

 

      30. Black Hawk-Eagle (Spizaetus tyrannus) – 2 (1 ad. & 1 imm.) seen flying over

            humid oak-conifer forest above Filo de Caballo at 8,000 ft.

 

FALCONIDAE

 

*    31. Collared Forest-Falcon (Micrastur semitorquatus) – 2 (a pair) heard and seen at

            dawn at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

      32. Crested Caracara (Caracara cheriway) – 1 seen in Pacific lowlands.

 

      33. American Kestrel (Falco sparverius) – Approx. 10 seen in the Pacific lowlands;

            1 seen by others somewhere along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

      34. Bat Falcon (Falco rufigularis) – 1 seen on the Pacific slope above Paraiso.

 

      35. Peregrine Falcon (Falco peregrinus) – 2 seen at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in

            Ixtapa.

 

RALLIDAE

 

      36. Purple Gallinule (Porphyrio martinica) – 4 seen in wetlands at Aztlan Parque

            Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

      37. Common Moorhen (Gallinula chloropus) – 10 seen in wetlands at Aztlan Parque

            Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

HAEMATOPODIDAE

 

      38. American Oystercatcher (Haematopus palliatus) – 2 seen on a rocky shore, at an

            ocean overlook between Zihuatanejo and Acapulco.

 

RECURVIROSTRIDAE

 

      39. Black-necked Stilt (Himantopus mexicanus) – 16 seen in Pacific lowlands (15 at

            Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

JACANIDAE

 

      40. Northern Jacana (Jacana spinosa) – 10 seen at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

SCOLOPACIDAE

 

H   41. Greater Yellowlegs (Tringa melanoleuca) – 1 heard at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in

            Ixtapa.

 

      42. Willet (Catoptrophorus semipalmatus) – 2 seen on beach at an ocean overlook

            between Zihuatanejo and Acapulco.

 

      43. Spotted Sandpiper (Actitis macularius) – 1 seen at Ixtapa.

 

      44. Long-billed Curlew (Numenius americanus) – 1 seen on beach at an ocean

            overlook between Zihuatanejo and Acapulco.

 

LARIDAE

 

      45. Laughing Gull (Larus atricilla) – Approx. 15 seen at a beach in Ixtapa.

 

      46. large tern species (Sterna sp.) – 1 large tern seen distantly at a beach in Ixtapa was

            probably a Caspian Tern.

 

COLUMBIDAE

 

#    47. Rock Pigeon (Columba livia) – A few were seen in the larger urban areas.

 

X   48. Red-billed Pigeon (Patagioenas flavirostris) – 2 seen by others alomg the road

            above Atoyac;  10 seen by others in lowland dry forest at Ixtapa.

 

      49. White-winged Dove (Zenaida asiatica) – Approx. 25 seen or heard in dry Pacific

            lowlands;  4 heard in dry Balsas scrub along the lower Milpillas-Filo de Caballo

            Road.

 

      50. Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura) – 4 seen in dry Balsas scrub along the lower

            Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

      51. Inca Dove (Columbina inca) – Approx. 25 seen or heard in Pacific lowlands;

            1 seen above Atoyac;  1 heard in Xochipala along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo

            Road.

X   52. Common Ground-Dove (Columbina passerina) – 2 seen by others somewhere

            along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

      53. Ruddy Ground-Dove (Columbina talpacoti) – Approx. 30 seen in Pacific

            lowlands.

 

      54. White-tipped Dove (Leptotila verreauxi) – 2 seen or heard above Atoyac;  5 seen

            or heard in Pacific lowlands at Ixtapa.

 

PSITTACIDAE

 

      55. Orange-fronted Parakeet (Aratinga canicularis) – Approx. 30 seen or heard above

            Atoyac;  8 seen or heard at 3,000 ft. along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

      56. White-fronted Parrot (Amazona albifrons) – 3 seen at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in

            Ixtapa.

 

      57. Lilac-crowned Parrot (Amaxona finschi) – A flock of approx. 100 was seen

            above Paraiso.

 

CUCULIDAE

 

      58. Squirrel Cuckoo (Piaya cayana) – 1 was seen in dry Balsas scrub at 3,000 ft.

            along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road;  4 seen at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in

            Ixtapa.

 

      59. Groove-billed Ani (Crotophaga sulcirostris) – Approx. 35 seen in Pacific

            lowlands (mostly in Ixtapa);  1 seen by others not far above Atoyac.

 

STRIGIDAE

 

H   60. Balsas Screech-Owl (Otus seductus) – 1 heard in dry Balsas scrub on lower

            Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

      61. Ferruginous Pygmy-Owl (Glaucidium brasilianum) – 1 seen and 3 heard in dry

            forest at Ixtapa;  1 Glaucidium sp. heard in dry Balsas scrub along the lower

            Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road may have been this species, or possibly Colima

            Pygmy-Owl.  I counted as few as 11 and as many as 31 evenly-spaced notes in

            each series of “hoots”. 

 

H   62. Mottled Owl (Ciccaba virgata) – 1 was heard at dawn in dry lowland forest at

            Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.


CAPRIMULGIDAE

 

      63. Lesser Nighthawk (Chordeiles acutipennis) – 4 seen at Aztlan Parque Ecologico

            in Ixtapa.

 

      64. Common Paraque (Nyctidromus albicollis) – 6 seen in dry forest or along roads

            adjacent to such habitat in Ixtapa.

 

APODIDAE

 

  1. large dark swift species (Streptoprocne sp.) – Approx. 15 fairly large dark swifts

            were seen in the sky above Atoyac in overcast conditions.  None of the

            Cypseloides swifts winter in Mexico.  This leaves Chestnut-collared, White-

            collared, and White-naped Swifts as the only remaining candidates.  In my

            opinion, they were too small to be either White-naped or White-collared Swifts,

            and I believe light conditions were good enough to see a white collar if they were

            the latter.  I believe they were more than likely Chestnut-collared Swifts, but I

            will need a better look before counting that species on my life list.

 

TROCHILIDAE

 

      66. Green Violet-ear (Colibri thalassinus) – A few were heard above Paraiso;

            Approx. 40 were seen or heard (mostly heard) in humid oak-conifer forest above

            Filo de Caballo.  This species was extremely vocal within forest openings and

            along roadsides.

 

      67. Dusky Hummingbird (Cynanthus sordidus) – 1 seen in thorn scrub at 3,000 ft.

            and 1 seen in dry oak scrub at 5,200 ft. along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road

 

      68. Broad-billed “Doubleday’s” Hummingbird (Cynanthus latirostris doubledayi) –

            2 seen in dry lowland forest at Ixtapa.

 

      69. White-eared Hummingbird (Hylocharis leucotis) – 3 seen at higher elevations

            above Atoyac;  10 seen at higher elevations of the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

      70. Berylline Hummingbird (Amazilia beryllina) – Approx. 10 seen at flowering Inga

            trees above Atoyac (lower elevation than White-tailed Hummingbird);  5 seen

            along the upper Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

      71. Cinnamon Hummingbird (Amazilia rutila) – 7 seen in dry forest and scrub at

            Ixtapa.

 

      72. Violet-crowned Hummingbird (Amazilia violiceps) – Approx. 10 seen in dry

            thorn and oak scrub along the lower Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

   

*    73. White-tailed Hummingbird (Eupherusa poliocerca) – Approx. 12 seen at higher

            elevations above Atoyac.  Replaced Berylline as the most common hummingbird

            at higher elevations.

 

*    74. Amethyst-throated Hummingbird (Lampornis amethystinus margaritae) – 2 males

            seen above Paraiso;  1 female seen above Filo de Caballo at around 8,000 ft.

 

*    75. Garnet-throated Hummingbird (Lamprolaima rhami) – 1 male seen above Paraiso

            feeding in the same flower patch as an Amethyst-throated Hummingbird.

 

      76. Magnificent Hummingbird (Eugenes fulgens) – 2 seen above Filo de Caballo at

            8,000 ft.

 

      77. Lucifer Hummingbird (Calothorax lucifer) – 2 female-plumaged individuals seen

            in dry scrub at 4,300 ft along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

      78. Archilochus-type hummingbird (Archilochus sp.) – 1 female/imm. bird was seen

            at a coastal overlook between Zihuatanejo and Acapulco;  Several individuals of

            this genus were seen in the dry forest patches at Ixtapa.  They were all females

            and immature males.  One immature male had a complete dark band across the

            lower throat on an otherwise immature-plumaged throat.  No color was seen.

            Range maps show both Black-chinned and Ruby-throated Hummingbirds

            wintering here.

 

      79. Calliope Hummingbird (Stellula calliope) – 1 female was seen above Atoyac.

 

*    80. Bumblebee Hummingbird (Atthis heloisa) – 1 female was seen above Atoyac;

            5 (including 2 territorial males) were seen above Filo de Caballo at about 8,000 ft.

 

      81. Rufous Hummingbird (Selasphorus rufus) – 1 female-plumaged bird was seen in

      dry oak scrub at 6,000 ft. along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road;  1 was seen

      by others in dry pine-oak forest at 7,000 ft. along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo

            Road.

 

TROGONIDAE

 

      82. Citreoline Trogon (Trogon citreolus) – 15 seen in dry lowland forest at Ixtapa.

 

      83. Mountain Trogon (Trogon mexicanus) – 3 were heard above Atoyac;  4 were seen

            or heard above Filo de Caballo.

 

MOMOTIDAE

 

      84. Russet-crowned Motmot (Momotus mexicanus) – 1 was seen in lowland scrub at

            Ixtapa.

 

ALCEDINIDAE

 

      85. Ringed Kingfisher (Ceryle torquatus) – 1 was seen at a pond in Ixtapa.

 

      86. Belted Kingfisher (Ceryle alcyon) – 2 seen in wetlands at Ixtapa.

 

      87. Green Kingfisher (Chloroceryle americana) – 1 was seen in a mangrove wetland

      at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

RAMPHASTIDAE

 

*    88. Wagler’s Toucanet (Aulacorhynchus wagleri) – 4 seen in humid forest above

            Paraiso.

 

PICIDAE

 

      89. Acorn Woodpecker (Melanerpes formicivorus) – 2 seen above Filo de Caballo at

            8,000 ft.

 

      90. Golden-cheeked Woodpecker (Melanerpes chrysogenys) – 2 seen in Balsas

            scrub at 3,000 ft. along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road;  7 seen in dry forest

            patches at Ixtapa.

 

X   91. Ladder-backed Woodpecker (Picoides scalaris) – 1 seen by others in dry forest at

            Ixtapa.

 

      92. Hairy Woodpecker (Picoides villosus) – 2 seen in humid oak-conifer forest above

            Filo de Caballo at 8,000 ft.

 

H   93. Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus) – 1 heard above Atoyac.

 

      94. Lineated Woodpecker (Dryocopus lineatus) – 1 heard by others above Atoyac;

            2 seen Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

FURNARIIDAE

 

      95. Scaly-throated Foliage-gleaner (Anabacerthia variegaticeps) – 3 seen in cloud

            forest above Atoyac.

 

DENDROCOLAPTIDAE

 

X   96. Olivaceous Woodcreeper (Sittasomus griseicapillus) – 1 seen by others in oak-

            conifer forest above Filo de Caballo at about 8,000 ft.

 

*    97. Ivory-billed Woodcreeper (Xiphorhynchus flavigaster) – 4 seen in dry lowland

            forest at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

      98. Spot-crowned Woodcreeper (Lepidocolaptes affinis) – 5 seen above Atoyac;

            2 seen above Filo de Caballo.

 

TYRANNIDAE

 

      99. Northern Beardless Tyrannulet (Camptostoma imberbe) – 2 seen and/or heard in

            dry Balsas scrub at 3,000 ft. along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road;  2 seen in

            dry forest at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

    100. Greenish Elaenia (Myiopagis viridicata) – 4 seen and/or heard above Atoyac;

            2 seen in oak-conifer forest above Filo de Caballo at 8,000 ft.;  3 seen in dry

            lowland forest at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

    101. Tufted Flycatcher (Mitrephanes phaeocercus) – 8 seen above Atoyac.

 

    102. Greater Pewee (Contopus pertinax) – 2 seen above Atoyac.

 

X 103. Yellow-bellied Flycatcher (Empidonax flaviventris) – 1 seen well and identified

            by Jesse in mangroves at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.  Howell and Webb’s

            Mexican field guide shows no records for Guerrero.

 

    104. Willow Flycatcher (Empidonax traillii) – 2 seen (at least one was calling) at

            Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

    105. Hammond’s Flycatcher (Empidonax hammondii) – 1 identified by others above

            Atoyac;  1 identified by others above Filo de Caballo.  I saw these birds but did

            not feel comfortable identifying them to species.  I need more practice with this

            genus.

 

    106. Dusky Flycatcher (Empidonax oberholseri) – 3 identified by others above Atoyac;

            1 bird that I felt comfortable calling this species was seen in an early succesion

            forest patch above Filo de Caballo at 8,000 ft.;  1 identified by others at Aztlan

            Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

X 107. Pacific-slope Flycatcher (Empidonax difficilis) – 1 calling bird at Aztlan Parque

            Ecologico in Ixtapa was identified by others as this species.

 

            “Western-type” empids (Empidonax occidentalis/difficilis) – 2 were seen above

            Atoyac;  2 seen above Filo de Caballo;  3 seen at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa may be Pacific-slope Flycatcher, but Howell’s bird guide indicates that the winter ranges of Cordilleran and Pacific-slope Flycatchers are not well known.  Therefore I simply called them all “Western-type” empids, except for the 1 heard Pacific-slope Flycatcher mentioned above.

 

            Unidentified empids (Empidonax sp.) -  10 above Atoyac; 5 above Filo de

            Caballo;  2 in arid Balsas scrub along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road;  14 in

            lowland forest and scrub at Ixtapa.

 

    108. Vermilion Flycatcher (Pyrocephalus rubinus) – 1 female seen at Aztlan Parque

            Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

    109. Bright-rumped Attila (Attila spadiceus) – 1 seen by others above Atoyac;  1 seen

            in lowland forest at Ixtapa.

 

    110. Dusky-capped Flycatcher (Myiarchus tuberculifer) – 4 seen and/or heard above

            Atoyac;  1 seen and heard above Filo de Caballo;  1 seen and heard in dry oak

            scrub at 6,000 ft. along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road;  3 seen and/or heard

            in dry lowland forest at Ixtapa.

 

    111. Ash-throated Flycatcher (Myiarchus cinerascens) – Approx. 20 in dry Balsas

            scrub along the lower Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

    112. Brown-crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus tyrannulus) – Approx. 15 in lowland forest

            and scrub at Ixtapa.

 

    113. Great Kiskadee (Pitangus sulphuratus) – 10 seen and/or heard in Pacific

            lowlands;  8 seen and/or heard not far above Atoyac.

 

H 114.  Boat-billed Flycatcher (Megarynchus pitangua) – I am fairly certain we heard 1

             above Atoyac.

 

    115. Social Flycatcher (Myiozetetes similis) – 10 seen between Atoyac and Paraiso;

            Approx. 15 seen and/or heard at Ixtapa sites.

 

    116. Tropical Kingbird (Tyrannus melancholicus) – Very common in lowlands.

 

    117. Thick-billed Kingbird (Tyrannus crassirostris) – 1 seen by others along the lower

            Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road;  2 seen in lowland forest and scrub at Ixtapa.

 

    118. Western Kingbird (Tyrannus verticalis) – Approx. 15 seen in dry Balsas scrub at

            3,000 ft. along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.  These birds seemed to be on

            the move.

 

    119. Scissor-tailed Flycatcher (Tyrannus forficatus) – 5 seen in Pacific lowlands.

 

    120. Rose-throated Becard (Pachyramphus aglaiae) – 2 seen above Atoyac;  1 seen by

            others above Filo de Caballo;  5 seen at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

LANIIDAE

 

    121. Loggerhead Shrike (Lanius ludovicianus) – 1 seen in dry Balsas scrub at 4,300 ft.

            along the lower Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

VIREONIDAE

 

    122. Bell’s Vireo (Vireo bellii) – 11 seen in lowland forest and scrub at Aztlan Parque

            Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

    123. Black-capped Vireo (Vireo atricapilla) – 1 seen in dense understory at Aztlan

            Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

    124. Plumbeous Vireo (Vireo plumbeus) – 1 seen in dry oak scrub at 5,200 ft. along the

            Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

    125. Cassin’s Vireo (Vireo cassinii) – 1 seen in humid oak-conifer forest above Filo de

            Caballo at 8,000 ft.

 

    126. Hutton’s Vireo (Vireo huttoni) – 1 seen above Atoyac;  4 seen and/or heard above

            Filo de Caballo.

 

    127. Golden Vireo (Vireo hypochryseus) – 2 seen above Atoyac.

 

    128. Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus) – 8 seen in mountains above Atoyac;  Approx. 15

            seen above Filo de Caballo at 8,000 ft.;  5 seen in lowland forest at Aztlan Parque

            Ecologico in Ixtapa.  Lowland birds (winter residents) appeared to be a different

            subspecies than those seen in the mountains (presumably permanent residents).

            The mountain birds were generally grayer.

 

    129. Chestnut-sided Shrike-Vireo (Vireolanius melitophrys) – 1 heard above Paraiso;

            1 seen just above Filo de Caballo at 7,400 ft. in pine-oak forest.

 

CORVIDAE

 

    130. Steller’s Jay (Cyanocitta stelleri) – 2 seen in humid oak-conifer forest above Filo

            de Caballo at about 8,000 ft.

 

*  131. White-throated Magpie-Jay (Calocitta formosa) – 2 seen in coastal lowlands;

            2 seen while driving between Acapulco and Chilpancingo;  6 seen not far above

            Atoyac.

 

    132. San Blas Jay (Cyanocorax sanblasianus) – 2 seen in lowland forest at Ixtapa.

 

*  133. White-throated Jay (Cyanolyca mirabilis) – 2 seen in humid oak-conifer forest

            above Filo de Caballo at about 8,000 ft.

G 134. Western Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma californica) – 2 glimpsed and heard in dry oak

            scrub at 5,200 ft. along the lower Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

    135. Unicolored Jay (Aphelocoma unicolor) – 5 seen in humid pine-oak forest above

            Paraiso at approx. 6,000 ft.;  2 heard and glimpsed in humid oak-conifer forest

            above Filo de Caballo at about 8,000 ft.

 

HIRUNDINIDAE

 

    136. Gray-breasted Martin (Progne chalybea) – 100+ roosting in the town of Atoyac;

            300+ roosting on high power lines at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

    137. Mangrove Swallow (Tachycineta albilinea) – At least 5 seen at Aztlan Parque

            Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

    138. Violet-green Swallow (Tachycineta thalassina) – Approx. 100 seen above Filo de

            Caballo at around 8,000 ft.

 

    139. Northern Rough-winged Swallow (Stelgidopteryx serripennis) – 27 seen in

            Pacific lowlands, mostly around Ixtapa.

 

PARIDAE

 

    140. Bridled Titmouse (Baeolophus wollweberi) – 1 seen in oak scrub at 5,200 ft.

 

CERTHIIDAE

 

    141. Brown Creeper (Certhia americana) – 2 seen in humid oak-conifer forest above

            Filo de Caballo at 8,000 ft.

 

TROGLODYTIDAE

 

*  142. Rufous-naped Wren (Campylorhynchus rufinucha) – 16 seen in lowland dry

            forest at Ixtapa, mostly at Aztlan Parque Ecologico.

 

    143. Happy Wren (Thryothorus felix) – 2 heard in oak-thorn scrub at 6,000 ft. along

            the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road;  Approx. 10 seen or heard in lowland forest

            patches at Ixtapa, especially at Aztlan Parque Ecologico.

 

*  144. White-bellied Wren (Uropsila leucogastra) – 12 seen in lowland forest at Parque

            Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

    145. Gray-breasted Wood-Wren (Henicorhina leucophrys) – 5 seen or heard above

            Paraiso;  2 heard above Filo de Caballo.

   

REGULIDAE

 

    146. Ruby-crowned Kinglet (Regulus calendula) – 8 seen or heard above Atoyac;

            7 seen or heard at various stops along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

SYLVIIDAE

 

    147. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea) – Approx. 60 seen during trip.

            Recorded in all habitats and at all elevations, but especially in the dry scrub of the

            Balsas Drainage and lowland forest patches at Ixtapa.  Where were the White-

            lored Gnatcatchers???

 

TURDIDAE

 

    148. Brown-backed Solitaire (Myadestes occidentalis) – Approx. 20 seen or heard

            above Atoyac (mostly if not all above Paraiso);  Approx. 10 seen or heard above

            Filo de Caballo.

 

    149. Orange-billed Nightingale-Thrush (Catharus aurantiirostris) – 1 seen above

            Paraiso;  1 seen above Filo de Caballo at about 8,000 ft.

 

    150. Russet Nightingale-Thrush (Catharus occidentalis) – 2 seen above Paraiso;

            1 seen above Filo de Caballo at around 8,000 ft.

 

    151. Hermit Thrush (Catharus guttatus) – Approx. 10 seen above Paraiso.

 

*  152. White-throated Robin (Turdus assimilis) – 2 seen above Paraiso;  5 seen above

            Filo de Caballo foraging with Aztec Thrushes at about 8,000 ft.

 

    153. Rufous-backed Robin (Turdus rufopalliatus) – 1 seen not far above Atoyac;

           10 seen in lowlands, mostly at Ixtapa.

 

X 154. American Robin (Turdus migratorius) – 3 seen by others above Filo de Caballo at

            8,000 ft.

 

*  155. Aztec Thrush (Ridgwayia pinicola) – A foraging group of approx. 10 was seen in

            humid oak-conifer forest above Filo de Caballo at about 8,000 ft.  Other species

            foraging in their vicinity included White-throated Robin, Steller’s Jay, White-

            throated Jay, Mountain Trogon, and others.

 

MIMIDAE

 

    156. Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) – 1 seen in arid scrub at 3,000 ft.

            along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

 

    157. Blue Mockingbird (Melanotis caerulescens) – 1 seen in humid oak-conifer forest

            above Filo de Caballo at about 8,000 ft;  1 seen on a flowering agave at 7,000 ft.

            in dry pine-oak forest along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

BOMBYCILLIDAE

 

    158. Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum) – Approx. 40 seen in humid oak-conifer

            forest above Filo de Caballo at 8,000 ft.

 

PTILOGONATIDAE

 

    159. Gray Silky-Flycatcher (Ptilogonys cinereus) – 15 seen or heard above Paraiso;

            Approx. 50 seen or heard above Filo de Caballo at 8,000 ft.

 

PEUCEDRAMIDAE

 

    160. Olive Warbler (Peucedramus taeniatus) – 3 seen above Paraiso.

 

PARULIDAE

 

    161. Orange-crowned Warbler (Vermivora celata) – 1 seen above Paraiso;  6 seen

            above Filo de Caballo.

 

    162. Nashville Warbler (Vermivora ruficapilla) – Approx. 20 seen above Atoyac;

            Approx. 20 seen above Filo de Caballo;  12 seen in forest patches at Ixtapa.

 

    163. Virginia’s Warbler (Vermivora virginiae) – 1 seen in arid scrub at 3,000 ft. along

            the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

    164. Crescent-chested Warbler (Parula superciliosa) – 4 seen above Atoyac.

 

    165. Tropical Parula (Parula pitiayumi) – 1 seen at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

    166. Yellow Warbler (Dendroica petechia) – Approx. 60 seen or heard in forest

            patches at Ixtapa.

 

    167. Yellow-rumped Warbler (Dendroica coronata) – 2 seen above Atoyac;  Approx.

            70 seen or heard above Filo de Caballo.  Most, if not all, were Audubon’s type.

 

    168. Black-throated Gray Warbler (Dendroica nigrescens) – 1 seen in oak-thorn scrub

            at 5,200 ft., and 3 seen at 6,000 ft. along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

    169. Black-throated Green Warbler (Dendroica virens) – 12 seen above Atoyac.

 

    170. Townsend’s Warbler (Dendroica townsendi) – 10 seen above Paraiso;  6 seen in

            humid oak-conifer forest above Filo de Caballo at 8,000 ft.;  1 seen in dry pine-

            oak forest at 7,000 ft. along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

    171. Hermit Warbler (Dendroica occidentalis) – 4 seen above Paraiso.

 

    172. Black-and-White Warbler (Mniotilta varia) – 1 seen above Atoyac;  2 seen above

            Filo de Caballo at 8,000 ft.;  1 seen in oak-thorn scrub at 5,200 ft. along the

            Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road;  9 seen in lowland forest at Ixtapa.

 

    173. American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla) – 4 seen at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in

            Ixtapa.

 

    174. Prothonotary Warbler (Protonotaria citrea) – 1 female seen in mangroves at

            Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.  Howell’s field guide indicates no records for

            this species in Guerrero.  Craig and I saw this bird and are certain of its

            identification.  We have seen many Prothonotary Warblers in East Texas both as

            migrants and breeders.

 

    175. Northern Waterthrush (Seiurus noveboracensis) – 1 seen in mangroves at Aztlan

            Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

    176. MacGillivray’s Warbler (Oporornis tolmiei) – 2 seen in humid oak-conifer forest

            understory above Filo de Caballo at about 8,000 ft,;  7 seen in understory of

            lowland forest patches in Ixtapa.

 

    177. Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas) – 3 seen in marshy habitats at Aztlan

            Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

X 178. Gray-crowned Yellowthroat (Geothlypis poliocephala) – 1 seen by others in

            cattails at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

    179. Wilson’s Warbler (Wilsonia pusilla) – Approx. 20 seen above Atoyac;  Approx.

           10 seen above Filo de Caballo;  2 seen at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

    180. Red-faced Warbler (Cardellina rubrifrons) – 1 seen in humid oak-conifer forest

            above Filo de Caballo at about 8,000 ft.

 

    181. Red Warbler (Ergaticus ruber) – 4 seen above Paraiso;  2 seen above Filo de

            Caballo.

 

    182. Painted Redstart (Myioborus pictus) – 1 seen in dry pine-oak forest at 7,000 ft.

            along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

    183. Slate-throated Redstart (Myioborus miniatus) – 12 seen above Paraiso;  6 seen

            above Filo de Caballo.

    184. Fan-tailed Warbler (Euthlypis lachrymosa) – A foraging party of 5 was seen

            above Filo de Caballo at 8,000 ft.(high elevation for this species?);  Jesse and I

            watched 1 closely following an armadillo at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

185. Golden-crowned Warbler (Basileuterus culicivorus) – 9 seen above Atoyac.

 

X 186. Rufous-capped Warbler (Basileuterus rufifrons) – 2 seen by others somewhere

            along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

    187. Golden-browed Warbler (Basileuterus belli) – 2 seen above Paraiso;  1 seen

            above Filo de Caballo.

 

    188. Yellow-breasted Chat (Icteria virens) – 6 seen in lowland forest patches at Ixtapa.

 

THRAUPIDAE

 

    189. Common Bush-Tanager (Chlorospingus ophthalmicus) – Approx. 30 were seen

            above Atoyac;  5 seen above Filo de Caballo.

 

X 190. Hepatic Tanager (Piranga flava) – 1 was seen by others somewhere along the

            Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

    191. Summer Tanager (Piranga rubra) – 2 seen in lowlands at Aztlan Parque

            Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

    192. Western Tanager (Piranga ludoviciana) – 1 seen in oak-thorn scrub at 6,000 ft.

            along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road;  1 seen in humid oak-conifer forest

            above Filo de Caballo;  2 others seen somewhere along the Milpillas-Filo de

            Caballo Road;  1 seen in lowland forest patches at Ixtapa.

 

    193. Flame-colored Tanager (Piranga bidentata) -  Approx. 10 seen above Paraiso;

            1 seen in humid oak-pine forest above Filo de Caballo at about 8,000 ft.

 

    194. Red-legged Honeycreeper (Cyanerpes cyaneus) – A group of approx. 10 (no adult

            males) seen in flowering Inga trees between San Vicente and Paraiso.

 

EMBERIZIDAE

 

    195. White-collared “Cinnamon-rumped” Seedeater (Sporophila torqueola

            torqueola) – Approx. 30 seen at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

X 196. Ruddy-breasted Seedeater (Sporophila minuta) – Jesse is fairly certain he saw 1 at

            Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

*  197. Cinnamon-bellied Flowerpiercer (Diglossa baritula) – 1 female/imm. seen

            nectaring on flowers in roadside scrub above Paraiso;  1 seen at a flowering agave

            in dry pine-oak forest at 7,000 ft. along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road;  2

            seen at forest openings in humid oak-conifer forest above Filo de Caballo at

            around 8,000 ft.

 

    198. Rufous-capped Brush-Finch (Atlapetes pileatus) – 1 seen in humid oak-conifer

            forest edge above Filo de Caballo at about 8,000 ft.

 

    199. Chestnut-capped Brush-Finch (Buarremon brunneinucha) – 8 seen above Paraiso;

            3 seen above Filo de Caballo.

 

    200. Olive Sparrow (Arremonops rufivirgatus) – 1 seen in lowland dry forest at Ixtapa.

 

H 201. Collared Towhee (Pipilo ocai) – 3 heard calling in humid oak-conifer forest edge

            above Filo de Caballo at about 8,000 ft.

 

*  202. Stripe-headed Sparrow (Aimophila ruficauda) – 4 seen in lowland scrub next to

            an ocean overlook between Zihuatanejo and Acapulco;  2 seen by others in

            lowland scrub at Ixtapa.

 

*  203. Black-chested Sparrow (Aimophila humeralis) –Approx. 10 seen in dry scrub

            (3,000 and 4,300 ft.) of the Balsas Drainage along the lower Milpillas-Filo de

            Caballo Road.

 

    204. Rufous-crowned Sparrow (Aimophila ruficeps) – 4 seen in oak-thorn scrub at

            5,200 ft. along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

G 205. Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina) – A flock of 10-15 was seen in oak-thorn

            scrub at 6,000 ft. along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

    206. Lark Sparrow (Chondestes grammacus) – 1 was seen in thorn scrub at 3,000 ft.

            along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

    207. Lincoln’s Sparrow (Melospiza lincolnii) – 1 was seen at Aztlan Parque Ecologico

            in Ixtapa.

 

    208. Yellow-eyed Junco (Junco phaeonotus) – 1 seen in dry pine-oak forest at 7,000 ft.

            along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road;  2 seen by others in an opening above

            Filo de Caballo at 8,000 ft.

 

CARDINALIDAE

 

    209. Grayish Saltator (Saltator coerulescens) – 2 seen at a forest edge between San

            Vicente and Paraiso;  6 seen in lowland forest patches at Ixtapa.

 

    210. Black-headed Saltator (Saltator atriceps) – 3 seen at a forest edge between San

            Vicente and Paraiso.

 

    211. Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis) – 5 seen in lowland forest at Aztlan

            Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

    212. Rose-breasted Grosbeak (Pheucticus ludivicianus) – 5 seen above Atoyac.

 

    213. Black-headed Grosbeak (Pheucticus melanocephalus) – Approx. 10 seen in

            humid oak-conifer forest above Filo de Caballo at about 8,000 ft.

 

    214. Blue Bunting (Cyanocompsa parellina) – 2 females seen at lowland forest edge at

            Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

    215. Indigo Bunting (Passerina cyanea) – 1 female was seen in a weedy opening at

            Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

*  216. Orange-breasted Bunting (Passerina leclancherii) – 1 exquisite male seen in

            Balsas thorn scrub at 3,000 ft. along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road;

            4 (3 females, 1 imm. male) seen at the edge of a scrubby opening in lowland

            forest at Ixtapa.

 

    217. Varied Bunting (Passerina versicolor) – 1 female seen in thorn scrub at 3,000 ft.

            along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

    218. Painted Bunting (Passerina ciris) – 6 seen in lowland forest at Aztlan Parque

            Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

ICTERIDAE

 

    219. Great-tailed Grackle (Quiscalus mexicanus) – Common in cities and towns.

 

    220. Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater) – Approx. 60 in the town of Xochipala

            on the lower Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

    221. Black-vented Oriole (Icterus wagleri) – 5 seen in oak-thorn scrub along the lower

            Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road;  1 seen in lowland forest at Ixtapa.

 

    222. Orchard Oriole (Icterus spurius) – Approx. 20 seen in lowland forest (mostly at

            Aztlan Parque Ecologico) in Ixtapa.

 

    223. Streak-backed Oriole (Icterus pustulatus) – Approx. 10 seen in thorn scrub at

            3,000 and 4,300 ft. along the lower Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road;  Approx. 15

            seen at various sites around Ixtapa.

 

 

    224. Bullock’s Oriole (Icterus bullockii) – 2 seen by others above Filo de Caballo;

            1 seen on a flowering agave in dry pine-oak forest, at 7,000 ft. along the

            Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

X 225. Altamira Oriole (Icterus gularis) – 2 seen by others at Aztlan Parque Ecologico

             in Ixtapa.

 

    226. Audubon’s Oriole (Icterus graduacauda dickeyae) – 1 seen at forest edge

            between San Vicente and Paraiso.

 

    227. Scott’s Oriole (Icterus parisorum) – 5 seen in humid oak-conifer forest above Filo

            de Caballo at bout 8,000 ft.;  2 seen on flowering agaves in dry pine-oak forest at

            7,000 ft. along the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

    228. Yellow-winged Cacique (Cacicus melanicterus) – 3 seen not far above Atoyac;

            Approx. 40 seen in Pacific lowlands, mostly at Ixtapa.

 

FRINGILLIDAE

 

    229. Scrub Euphonia (Euphonia affinis godmani) – Approx. 10 seen in lowland

            patches at Ixtapa, mostly at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

    230. Elegant Euphonia (Euphonia elegantissima) – 1 young male in the process of

            attaining adult plumage seen in thorn scrub at 4,300 ft. along the lower Milpillas-

            Filo de Caballo Road.

 

    231. House Finch (Carpodacus mexicanus) – 3 seen in thorn scrub at 3,000 ft. along

            the Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

X 232. Black-headed Siskin (Carduelis notata) – 6 seen by others in humid oak-conifer

            forest above Filo de Caballo at 8,000 ft.

 

    233. Lesser Goldfinch (Carduelis psaltria) – 5 seen at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in

            Ixtapa.

 

#  234. House Sparrow (Passer domesticus) – 8 seen in urban areas in lowlands;  3 seen

            in Xochipala along the lower Milpillas-Filo de Caballo Road.

 

 

OTHER WILDLIFE

 

Common and scientific names of mammals were taken from Neotropical Rainforest Mammals, A Field Guide, 1990, by Emmons and Feer.  Reptile names were taken from Reptiles and Amphibians, Eastern/Central North America, 1998, of the Peterson Field Guides series.

 

 

Red-bellied Squirrel (Sciurus aureogaster) – A few were seen in the mountains and at Aztlan Parque Ecologico.

 

White-nosed Coati (Nasua narica) – 1 seen at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

Green Iguana (Iguana iguana) – A few were seen at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.

 

American Crocodile (Crocodylus acutus) – 5 seen at Aztlan Parque Ecologico in Ixtapa.



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