NW Ecuador Bird Trip Nov 15-24, 2002

 

 

Participants: Chris Fagyal, Carol Schumacher, Steve Weston

 

Guide: Nick Athanas  http://www.tropicalbirding.com

 

Arrangements: Cristina of Tropical Birding

 

Itinerary:

 

Nov 15 – Arrive Quito, night in Quito.

Nov 16 – Yanachoca (YAN)

Nov 17 – Upper Tandayapa Valley (UTV)

Nov 18 – Los Bancos [Moss Backed Tanager Rd] (LB)

Nov 19 – Tandayapa Lodge (TBL), Calicali

Nov 20 – Pedro Vicente Maldonado (PVM)

Nov 21 – Old Nono Mindo Rd (NON)

Nov 22 – Cuatro Rios (4R)

Nov 23 – Tandayapa Lodge (TBL)

Nov 24 – North of Pedro Vicente Maldonado

 

Chocó Endemics are bolded.

Background/Overview:

 

Northwestern Ecuador is a birders paradise, and Tandayapa Lodge is at the heart of it.  From Tandayapa there are multiple sites within 2 hours drive with over 600 species possible in this area of Ecuador.  The lodge itself sits at roughly 1750m in altitude and is nestled in absolutely splendid cloud forest habitat.  On the balcony of the lodge, the owners, Iain Campbell and his wife Cristina have put out a slew of hummingbird feeders which regularily attract upwards of 20 species in a day, with 10-12 being visible in any given 5 minute period.  We stayed at Tandayapa Lodge the entire time, making day trips to the various sites in NW Ecuador.

 

The area around the Tandayapa Valley holds numerous threatened birds and regional endemics.  The valley is part of an Endemic Bird Area (EBA) called the Chocó endemic area.  This area covers NW Ecuador and SW Colombia.  64 different endemics occur in the Chocó EBA.  Of these 64 endemics, 21 occur in the Tandayapa Valley, 6 of which are considered Near-Threatened (Dark-Backed Wood-Quail, Rufescent Screech-Owl, Hoary Puffleg, Toucan Barbet, Plate-Billed Mountain-Toucan, and Beautiful Jay) and 2 of which are considered Vulnerable (Long-wattled Umbrellabird and Tanager Finch) by Birdlife International.  Also found in the valley are Ecuadorian Thrush (A tumbesian Endemic) and Giant Antpitta (A High Central Andean endemic). 

 

Our guide, Nick Athanas, of Tropical Birding was absolutely splendid.  He knew the calls as well as anyone I’ve ever birded with, was very easy to get along with, and worked very hard to get us as many birds as possible.  I can not recommend him highly enough. 

 

All of our arrangements were made by Cristina, Iain’s wife.  She was very nice, responded quickly to questions, and arranged everything flawlessly.  It was amazing how the atmosphere at Tandayapa Lodge changed when she was around compared to when she was in Quito attending to the business side of things.  She definitely helped make Tandayapa a wonderfully charming place to stay.

 

The weather in November in Ecuador was generally pleasant at the lodge, with the mornings being generally clear and mild, and the afternoons being pleasantly warm, but not “tropical”.  Typical cloud forest weather, and my favorite climate in the world.  PVM (400-500m), LB(1150m), and 4R(700-800m) were typically tropical with high humidity and very warm temperatures, being at much lower elevations.  It rained on a few occasions in the afternoons, specifically at Tandayapa on the 20th, and at PVM, but on the whole the weather was splendid the entire time.  One morning, on the 22nd at PVM we encounter very thick fog which lasted until about 8:30-9:00am, which while making the birding difficult at that time, made for a very mystical experience walking along the road.

 

Day 1 – Nov 15 – Arrival:

 

Day 1 we all fly to Houston on separate flights where we meet up to head to Quito.  We land in Quito on time around 10:50pm, go through customs with no problems and await our baggage.  I start getting worried as Steve’s bag is near the last bag to show up, and we spend a good 15-20 mins waiting for  it.  Finally we head out of the airport and meet our driver which Cristina arranged for us.  Our driver then took us to Hostal La Rubida somewhere in Quito (I was too tired to pay attention).  It was a very nice, small, quiet little hotel.  The owner spoke absolutely no english, which was nice because I got a chance to practice spanish.  Virtually my only opportunity the entire trip minus a few drink and food requests at Tandayapa.  Finally asleep around 1am.

 

Day 2 – Nov 16 - Yanacocha

 

A very early morning this morning, as we awaken at 4:30am to meet Nick by 5am.  Nick arrives promptly and we are off to Yanacocha to be there by dawn.  On the way to Yanacocha we spot a flock of Eared Doves, which we just glance at as we pass by.  They prove to be the only Eared Doves of the trip.  Around 6:00am we reach the gate to Yanacocha and find the gatekeeper is not around.  There are a few hummingbird feeders near the gate so we look around and do our first real birding of the trip.  It is very cold up at this elevation (Yanacocha rises to an altitude of 3400m at the end of the road.  We are probably at 2600-2700m at this point and its in the 50’s I’d say.  I didn’t bring a jacket either).  Up along the side of the hill on the left hand side of the road we spot an American Kestrel perched, but quickly our attention is drawn to the hummingbird feeder where we see Buff-Winged Starfrontlet and Tyrian Metaltail.  A prelude of things to come.  Also amongst the thick vegetation and near the hummingbird feeders we see our first flower-piercers, getting good looks at Glossy, Black and Masked flower-piercers.  Also flitting around the hillside is a White-browed Spinetail.  Finally the gate keeper shows up and opens the gate for us and we start heading up the road.  Along the road we stop at various points, including the different hummingbird feeders.   We spot several other hummers including Sword-Billed Hummingbird, Mountain Velvetbreast, Shining Sunbeam, Sapphire-vented Puffleg, Golden-beasted Puffleg.  It is also along the road where we first encounter the frustrations associated with Antpittas and Tapaculos.  We had an Ocellated Tapaculo at 5 feet, but despite its incessant calling and our patient waiting, it never showed itself.  Other heard only’s include Undulated Antpitta, Rufous Antpitta, and Tawny Antpitta.  One surpise however was an immature Unicolored Tapaculo that apparently forgot what it was and gave us a wonderful show as it foraged out in the open along a fallen branch and surrounding vegetation.  An Ashy-colored Tapaculo showed well also.  Birding as a whole was rather slow on the way up, but it was extremely pleasant weatherwise and the scenery was downright spectacular.  I would love to go to Yanacocha again.  After arriving down at the gate for lunch and spending some time relaxing and eating (walking at this altitude is taxing on the body), we head down the road heading towards Tandayapa.  We stop several times and pick up such wonderful birds as Cinerous Conebill, Blue-backed Conebill, Scarlet-Bellied Mountain-Tanager, Hooded Mountain Tanager, Black-Chested Mountain-Tanager, Supercilliaried Hemispingus, Black-Crested Warbler and Rufous Wren.  On the way to Tandayapa we stop along the Old Nono-Mindo Rd for some quick roadside birding picking up Grass-Green Tanager, Blue-and-Black Tanager,  and Black-Capped Tanager.  We also stopped along the road where there is an Andean Cock-of-the-Rock Lek across the valley.  It is quite a distance away, but with a scope you can get pretty nice views.  There were at least a dozen calling, and we got pretty nice views of 5 or 6 of them.  We made it to Tandayapa Lodge shortly before dark and enjoy some quick birding on the balcony picking up nearly a dozen hummingbirds in the span of 10 minutes or so including Green Violet-Ear, Sparkling Violet-Ear, Western Emerald, Rufous-Tailed Hummingbird, Andean Emerald, Empress Brilliant, Fawn-Breasted Brilliant, Brown Inca, Collared Inca, Booted Raquet-Tail, Violet-Tailed Slyph, Buff-Tailed Coronet, and Purple-Throated Woodstar.  As night fell we stood out on the balcony and had a Rufous-bellied Nighthawk that typically seems to fly over the lodge each night.

 

Day 3 – Nov 17 – Upper Tandayapa Valley

 

Up at 5:15am or so this morning for an early breakfast and then up the road from Tandayapa to start getting some more of the Chocó endemics of the region.  Not more than 15 minutes from the lodge we came upon a Beautiful Jay.  Farther up the road we stopped several times along the side of the road and found plenty of wonderful birds including Gorgeted Sunangel, Speckled Hummingbird, Green-and-Black Fruiteater, Plate-Billed Mountain Toucans, Toucan Barbets,  Golden-Headed Quetzal, Glossy-Black Thrush, Blue-Winged Mountain-Tanagers and Great Trush.  There is evidence all along the road of the Pipeline that is going in.  Several places along the road are very difficult to travel along because of the construction, but overall they seem to be trying to minimize the impact.  My biggest concern is what happens if the pipeline breaks.  It could be devastating on this area.  One nice thing about this road is how incredibly easy and relaxing the birding is.  You are up in the cloud forest, starting at 1750m and heading gently upwards as you travel up the road.  There is cloud forest on both sides of the road, so almost anywhere you stop can be great birding, and incredible mixed flocks can be anywhere.  Around mid morning we ran into a stunning flock that had more birds in it than could be seen or identified by all.  Everyone ended up getting a few different species out of this flock.  Some of what I found included Azara’s Spinetail, Rufous Spinetail, Pearled Treerunner, Lineated Foliage-Gleaner, Striped Treehunter, White-Crested Elaenia, White-Tailed Tyrannulet, Golden Tanager, Golden-Naped Tanager, and Dusky Bush-Tanager.  We also had more frustrating antpitta and tapaculo listening sessions hearing Chestnut-Crowned Antpitta, Spillman’s Tapaculo, and Ocellated Tapaculo but never getting a good glimpse at any of them.  Around noon we headed back to the lodge for lunch and then birded down the road past Tandayapa.  This allowed us to pick up a bunch of species not generally seen at the higher elevations of the road.  Some interesting birds picked up include Golden-Olive Woodpecker, Smoky-Brown Woodpecker, Red-faced Spinetail, Uniform Antshrike, Ashy-Headed Tyrannulet, Rufous-Winged Tyrannulet, Whiskered Wren, Thick-Billed Euphonia, Black-Capped Tanager, White-Winged Tanager,  White-Winged Brush-Finch and Chestnut-capped Brush-finch.

 

Day 4 – Nov 18 - Los Bancos, Mindo

 

Today had us waking up VERY early.  4am early so that we could get on the road by 4:45am or so and to Los Bancos for the dawn chorus.  Los Bancos is at about 1100m and is basically a long road near the pipeline with patches of lowland forest scattered about.  The birding is excellent.  The road your birding along in Los Bancos has been renamed by birders to Moss-Backed Tanager Rd, and for good reason.  This is one of the only places to reliably find them.  We had good luck almost immediately seeing them and a multitude of other tanagers including Rufous-Throated Tanager, Golden Tanager, Gray-and-Gold Tanager, Bay-headed Tanager, Beryl-spangled Tanager, Moss-Backed Tanager, Swallow Tanager, Lemon-rumped Tanager (everywhere!), and Ochre-breasted Tanager.  One pleasant surprise while walking along the road from where we parked was running into a nesting pair of Tiny Hawks.  These are pretty rare in the lowlands and foothills of NW Ecuador and finding this nesting pair was a real treat.  We also had a perched Plain-breasted Hawk which again isn’t very common.  Another treat was finding a Purple-chested Hummingbird feeding in some flowers near the car.  Also seen at Los Bancos in the hummingbird family was another Chocó endemic, a Purple-bibbed Whitetip. Today was our first encounter with Pale-Mandibled Aracaris.  We were fortunate enough to see a group of 6 of them perched at relatively close range.  Also present in Los Bancos in this group were Chocó Toucans and Chestnut-mandibled Toucans.  A Dusky Pigeon also made an appearance to add to our Chocó endemic list.  In the early afternoon we headed back towards Tandayapa and made a detour in Mindo.  We stopped at a place called Mindo Lindo, specifically for one hummer, Velvet-purple Coronet, which we saw only one of, but what a spectacular male it was. Plenty of other species were around to entertain us including White-whiskered Hermit and Violet-tailed Sylph.  While watching the hummingbird feeders we kept hearing a Quetzal call, and after some searching, it was found by a Wings tour group led by Paul Coopmans and all had pretty nice looks at a Golden-headed Quetzal.  Walking the trails in the forest behind Mindo Lindo is a good idea, because it’s a great place for Club-winged Manakin which has a very active lek here.  We saw a multitude of males displaying.  It was quite a sound and spectacle in the forest with all that snapping and cracking and males jumping all over the place.  We also stopped at a restaurant called Los Colibries in Mindo and watched their hummingbird feeders and the surrounding garden.  Some interesting species showed up before it started to rain heavily including White-necked Jacobin, Green-crowned Woodnymph, Green-crowned Brilliant, Gauyaquil Woodpecker, and Crimson-rumped Toucanet .  To top off the afternoon, I think the most interesting and surprising find was that of a Dagua Thrush, which really excited our guide, Nick quite a bit.  This particular individual is the only documented sighting in the area and was present for about a month apparently.  Generally this bird is quite rare in the lowlands and known mainly to occur in forest NW of La Celica (information garnered from the annotated checklist available at http://www.tandayapa.com)

 

Day 5 – Nov 19 – Tandayapa Lodge & Calicali

 

Today was a more relaxed day, with everyone allowed to sleep in until 5:30am!  We decided to spend the morning walking the trails at the lodge.  After a short stay watching the hummingbird feeders and picking up our obligatory dozen+ hummers in 5 minutes, we headed out onto the trails.  Birding was slow, as is most inner forest birding, but continually productive as we added species all along the trails.  Some good birds seen included Golden-headed Quetzal, Wedge-billed Hummingbird, Crimson-mantled Woodpecker, Spotted Barbtail, Rusty-winged Barbtail, Lineated Foliage-gleaner,  Tyrannine Woodcreeper, Strong-biller Woodcreeper, Spotted Woodcreeper, Rufous-winged Tyrannulet, Olivaceous Piha, and Scaled Fruiteater (heard only).  I think the most wonderful part of wandering the trails, aside from the absolutely gorgeous scenery, was during the return to the lodge for lunch.  We were heading back along the trails when Nick heard an Ochre-breasted Antpitta.  He stopped us, and we looked down into a rotting log and there it popped up into plain view, and just sat there for a good 30 seconds.  An absolutely incredible, breath-taking view from less than 8 feet.  Binoculars weren’t even necessary.  After we all caught our breath, we moved on and had our lunch.  After lunch we decided to go to Calicali.  This is an arid scrub site at about 2800m just outside of Quito.  It is completely different habitat from anyplace we were going and had some very specialized birds.  Anyone who has been to this area of Ecuador knows you go here for one bird specifically.  White-Tailed Shrike-tyrant.  These are quite local and rare, and this is the only site near this area to see them.  We got reasonably good flight views of 2 or 3 individuals at this site.  We also got looks at several other birds including Black-chested Buzzard-eagle, Black-tailed Trainbearer, Tufted Tit-tyrant, Spot-billed Ground-tyrant, Southern Yellow-grosbeak, Band-tailed Seedeater and White-winged Brushfinch

 

Day 6 – Nov 20 – Pedro Vicente Maldonado

 

Today was another really long day with a super early start, with breakfast being at 3:45am.  The drive to PVM is roughly 2 hours, and we wanted to be there for the dawn chorus, so off we went around 4am.  PVM is roadside birding along a long road with pretty good stretches of forested areas.  Unfortunately a lot of it is being deforested and parts of an area north of PVM that used to be wonderful birding are almost gone now according to Nick.  On our arrival at PVM we found the area shrouded in a deep fog, which made birding rather difficult to begin with.  We heard and eventually saw a Broad-billed Motmot shortly after we arrived.  We also had several new raptors within a short time of arriving including a perched Plumbeos Kite, and Swallow-tailed Kites soaring overhead.  Most interesting though was finding a pair of Barred Forest-Falcons, one of which perched in a tree just off the road for a good 30 minutes.  Being a lover of raptors in general, I studied it and watched it for quite some time while the others went off birding a bit more.  This also happened to be right near a White-Bearded Manakin lek, and after some searching to try to find a reasonable vantage point, all had pretty splendid looks.  Parrots were very well represented at PVM compared to the rest of the trip, with many species being seen including Chestnut-fronted Macaw, Maroon-tailed Parakeet, Rose-Faced Parrot, Blue-headed Parrot, Bronze-winged Parrot, and Mealy Amazon.  It was nice to finally get some numbers in the parrot family.  PVM was pretty light on the hummers, but we did pick up Purple-crowned Fairy and Green Thorntail while there.  No Purple-chested however which are generally reliable there.  Fortunately we got them at Los Bancos two days earlier.  PVM proved to be wonderful for woodpeckers, and within the same 100 feet or so of forest tract we got Red-Rumped and two Crimson-Bellied Woodpeckers.  They were just stunning.  Later on we had a Lineated that pecked away at the same tree for a good hour.  I sat and photographed him for quite some time.  Too bad my technique wasn’t anywhere near what it is today.  PVM also proved great for Antbirds and similar skulkers.  We had wonderful looks at Dot-winged Antwrens, Pacific-Streaked Antwren, Western Slaty-Antshrink, and Stub-Tailed Antbird.  Today also marked the first time we were frustrated by Scale-crested Pygmy-Tyrants.  We heard this bird today and several other days but only got good looks one time.  Flycatchers were abundant in PVM even though the insects, at least along the road, were not bad.  We picked up Golden-faced, Sooty-headed, Brown-capped and Yellow-crowned Tyannulets, Slaty-capped Flycatcher, Black-headed Tody-flycatcher, Snowy-throated Kingbird, Masked Tityra and Black-and-white Becard amongst others.  Also wonderful at PVM were the tanagers.  We had wonderful looks at a bunch of tanagers including the Chocó endemic Scarlet-breasted Dacnis as well as Purple Honeycreeper, Green Honeycreeper, Blue dacnis, Yellow-tufted Dacnis, Blue-necked Tanager, Golden-hooded Tanager, Gray-and-gold Tanager, White-shouldered Tanager, Tawny-crested Tanager and Guira Tanager.  We arrived back to Tandayapa just before dark and sat at the balcony watching the hummingbird display before dinner again.  What a relaxing way to end a day watching a dozen species of hummingbirds.

 

Day 7 – Nov 21 – Old Nono-Mindo Rd

 

Today was a more relaxing day, at least with regards to not having to get up at 4am again.  We explored the Western area of the Old Nono-Mindo Rd.  The goal today was to hopefully pick up a few more species that were missed during our morning in the Upper Tandayapa Valley, as this part of the Old Nono-Mindo Rd is at a higher elevation that the lodge.  We had great looks at several species we’d already been before but were very happy to see again such as Golden-Headed Quetzal, Gorgeted Sunangel, Toucan Barbet, Pale-Mandibled Aricari, and Plate-billed Mountain-Toucan.  We also encounter several new species for the trip including Streaked Tuftedcheek, Long-tailed Antbird, and finally we saw (and got pretty good, if not brief, looks at) a Nariño Tapaculo.  We also got good looks at several new flycatchers, including out nemesis heard-only the previous 3 days of the trip, Scale-Crested Pygmy-Tyrant, as well as Marble-faced Bristle-Tyrant, and Barred Becard.  We also finally caught up with another Chocó endemic that had been eluding us so far when we came across a single Yellow-collared Chlorophonia.  This guy proved difficult to see as it called and flitted about a bunch of bushes, but finally all were rewarded with good looks.  Other new tanagers included Flame-faced Tanager, Black-eared Hemispingus, and a single Plushcap.  The late afternoon found us hanging around the lodge watching the hummingbird feeders and generally relaxing.

 

Day 8 – Nov 22 – Cuatro Rios (Four Rivers), Los Bancos

 

Today was another long day on the road and an early start.  But we made it to Cuatro Rios by shortly after dawn.  Cuatro Rios is a lowland site around 700-800m or so, and the only place we really worried much about mosquitos, with everyone loading up on the bug spray/creme.  In the end the bugs were present, but not as bad as I had feared.  The trail in many places is very steep, and with as much rainfall and moisture that is present, it can be somewhat treacherous at times.  Taking the trail slowly, and paying attention, it is a very pleasant area to bird in however.  We had many new birds here including several heard only’s which were the only occurrence of the entire trip, such as Pallid Dove and Pacific Parrotlet.  Two new hummingbirds were found, Band-tailed Barbthroat and Stripe-throated Hermit.  Two new trogons were also found, Western White-tailed Trogon and Black-throated Trogon.  I think for me, the highlight of the day was getting good looks at a White-whiskered Puffbird.  Puffbirds have always been my nemesis ever since I started tropical birding, and this was my first one ever.  So I was, understandably, excited.   We also lucked out and got good looks at a few skulkers, including my first ever Antthrush, a Black-headed Anthrush.  We had to work extremely hard to finally see it, but it was well worth the reward.  Also seen well was a Chestnut-backed Antbird.  As we neared the end of the portion of the trail we were going to travel (the second bridge was washed out, and thus prevented further travel without some significant difficulty), we ran into an amazing mixed flock.  We were occupied for over an hour with this flock, and saw several species of funarids including Western Woodhaunter (heard only actually), Scaly-Throated Foliage-gleaner and Plain Xenops, as well as Plain Brown, Wedge-billed and Spotted Woodcreepers.  Also present in the flock were Spot-crowned Antvireo and White-flanked Antwren.  The flock also contained several flycatchers including Pacific Flatbill, White-throated Spadebill, Ruddy-tailed Flycatcher and several Cinnamon Becards.  Another great find amongst the flock was a Slay-capped Shrike-Vireo.  He proved tough to see at times, but after some persistence good looks were had.  Very cool bird.  Other new birds of the trip at Cuatro Rios included Tawny-Faced Gnatwren, Buff-rumped Warbler, Dusky-faced Tanager, Yellow-throated Bush-Tanager, and Slate-colored Grosbeak.  On the way back to Tandayapa we stopped at Los Bancos and drove all the way to the end of the road.  It was here we found the bird of the trip, and a bird that inevitably caused quite a stir from what I was told.  Walking along past the end of the road, we saw a Yellow-green Bush-Tanager.  This is a not very well known species listed as Vulnerable by Birdlife International.  These Bush-Tanagers, from what I’ve been told, are very local species and very rare in Ecuador.  Our guide, Nick Athanas, got very good looks through binoculars as did I.  We all agreed after much discussion and consulting of the Birds of Ecuador book that it was indeed this bird.  Tonight, around 8pm or so, while walking into the bathroom, I unfortunately sliced the bottom of my foot pretty good.  This pretty much curtailed my birding for the last 2 days of the trip.  I think however, if you read the next day, you’ll find at least for Nov 23, this was a bonus.

 

Day 9 – Nov 23 – Tandayapa Lodge

 

Because of my sliced foot, and everyones general exhaustion after several long days of driving, it was decided to spend the day in and around the lodge.  My two companions, Carol and Steve got up early with our guide and went out pre-dawn to do some owling and looking for other night birds.  If I remember right they saw a Lyre-tailed Nightjar, Pauraque, and heard an Andean Pygmy-Owl. I on the other hand hobbled down to the lower deck at Tandayapa Lodge and watched the trees which were coming into fruit.  Several birds showed up, mostly which were seen previously such as Golden-Headed Quetzal, Masked Trogon, Crimson-rumped Toucanet, Montane Woodcreeper, Blue-winged Mountain-Tanager, Golden Tanager and others.  New however was a beautiful Fawn-Breasted Tanager.  These usually shy tanagers can become rather conspicuous and easy to see when their favorite trees start to come into fruit.  One right next to the back door to the lodge was in full fruit and I was able to watch one for quite some time as it ignored all human activity and greedily fed away on the hundreds of fruits on this tree.  That afternoon, much excitement occurred as, for the first time in nearly 11 months, a White-Faced Nunbird showed up near the end of the Tanager trail at the lodge.  This is a bird that our guide, Nick Athanas, found the first documented Ecuadorian nesting record and studied extensively at Tandayapa Lodge a few years back.  He, nor anyone else, hadn’t seen the Nunbird at the lodge in nearly a year when this one was discovered.  Fabulous perched views were had by all for a good 15-20 minutes before it decided to move on.

 

Day 10 – Nov 24 – North of Pedro Vicente Maldonado

 

The last day of the tour found my companions north of PVM looking for some specialty birds that couldn’t be found elsewhere on the tour, while I stayed back at the lodge and rested up my very sore foot.  I was in no condition to do much walking unfortunately so I stayed down at the lower deck of the lodge and watched to see what would happen by.  Most of the same birds showed up as yesterday with the addition of Beryl-Spangled Tanager, Blue-and-Black Tanager, Rufous-winged Tyrannulet, White-tailed Tyrannulet, Golden-crowned Flycatcher.  While on the upper balcony waiting for lunch I had a large raptor soaring gracefully towards me.  Unfortunately, I was so entranced by the grace and beauty of it that I didn’t take any pictures with my camera so I have no documentation of it.  To me, it appeared to be a King Vulture, which I have seen several times in Costa Rica, but I was told by Iain, Nick, and Paul Coopmans that this is a nigh impossible sighting.  It was chalked up to a “Raptor sp.”, though with some looking at the Birds of Ecuador book, Barred Hawk seems the most likely choice. 

 

Bird List [h – denotes heard only] (location seen in parenthesis)

 

4R – Cuatro Rios

PVM – Pedro Vicente Maldonado

TBL – Tandayapa Bird Lodge

LB – Los Bancos

CALI – Calicali

UTV – Upper Tandayapa Valley

MIN – Mindo

NON – Old Nono-Mindo Rd

NPVM – North of PVM

 

 

Species Name (Chocό endemics in bold)

TBL

YAN

PVM

LB

CALI

MIN

UTV

4R

NON

1.          Little Tinamou (PVM) [h]

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

2.          Great Egret (4R)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

3.          Cattle Egret (PVM, LB)

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

4.          Black Vulture (PVM, LB, 4R)

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

X

 

5.          Turkey Vulture (PVM, LB, 4R)

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

X

 

6.          Swallow-Tailed Kite (PVM)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

7.          Plain-breasted Hawk (LB, NON)

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

8.          Plumbeous Kite (PVM, 4R)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

9.          Tiny Hawk (LB)

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

10.       Barred Hawk [h] (UTV)

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

11.       Roadside Hawk (PVM, LB, MIN, NON)

 

 

X

X

 

X

 

 

X

12.       Broad-winged Hawk (NON)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

13.       Black-chested Buzzard-Eagle (CALI)

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

14.       Barred Forest-Falcon (PVM)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

15.       American Kestrel (YAN, CALI)

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

16.       Rufous-fronted Wood-Quail [h] (PVM)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

17.       Dark-backed Wood-Quail [h] (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18.       White-throated Crake [h] (LB)

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

19.       Rock Pigeon (MIN)

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

20.       Band-Tailed Pigeon (YAN, MIN)

 

X

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

21.       Ruddy Pigeon (LB, 4R)

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

X

 

22.       Plumbeous Pigeon (UTV, TBL, NON)

X

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

23.       Dusky Pigeon (PVM)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

24.       Eared Dove (YAN, CALI)

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

25.       White-tipped Dove (TBL, MIN)

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

26.       Pallid Dove [h] (4R)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

27.       White-throated Quail-Dove [h] (PVM, TBL)

X

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

28.       Chestnut-fronted Macaw (PVM)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

29.       Maroon-Tailed Parakeet (PVM)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

30.       Pacific Parrotlet [h] (4R)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

31.       Rose-Faced Parrot (PVM)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

32.       Blue-headed Parrot (PVM)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

33.       Red-billed Parrot (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

34.       Bronze-Winged Parrot  (PVM, LB, MIN, 4R)

 

 

X

X

 

X

 

X

 

35.       Mealy Amazon (PVM, LB)

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

36.       Squirrel Cuckoo (TBL, UTV, PVM, NON, LB, MIN)

X

 

X

X

 

X

X

 

X

37.       Little Cuckoo (PVM)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

38.       Smooth-billed Ani (LB, NON)

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

39.       Striped Cuckoo (MIN, LB)

 

 

 

X

 

X

 

 

 

40.       Andean Pygmy-Owl [h] (YAN)

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

41.       Rufous-bellied Nighthawk (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

42.       White-collared Swift (YAN, TBL, PVM, LB, NON)

X

X

X

X

 

 

 

 

X

43.       Chestnut-collared Swift (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

44.       Gray-rumped Swift (LB, 4R)

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

X

 

45.       White-tipped Swift (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

46.       Band-tailed Barbthroat (4R)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

47.       White-whiskered Hermit (MIN)

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

48.       Tawny-bellied Hermit (TBL)

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

49.       Stripe-throated Hermit (PVM, 4R)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

50.       Green-fronted Lancebill (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

51.       White-necked Jacobin (MIN)

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

52.       Green Violet-ear (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

53.       Brown Violet-ear (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

54.       Sparkling Violet-ear (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

55.       Green Thorntail (PVM, NON)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

X

56.       Western Emerald (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

57.       Green-crowned Woodnymph (MIN)

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

58.       Rufous-tailed Hummingbird (TBL, PVM, MIN, LB)

X

 

X

X

 

X

 

 

 

59.       Andean Emerald (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

60.       Purple-chested Hummingbird (LB)

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

61.       Speckled Hummingbird (UTV)

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

62.       Purple-bibbed Whitetip (TBL, LB)

X

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

63.       Empress Brilliant (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

64.       Green-crowned Brilliant (MIN)

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

65.       Fawn-breasted Brilliant (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

66.       Shining Sunbeam (YAN)

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

67.       Great Sapphirewing (YAN)

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

68.       Brown Inca (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

69.       Collared Inca (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

70.       Buff-winged Starfrontlet (YAN)

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

71.       Sword-billed Hummingbird (YAN)

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

72.       Buff-tailed Coronet (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

73.       Velvet-purple Coronet (MIN)

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

74.       Gorgeted Sunangel (UTV, NON)

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

75.       Sapphire-vented Puffleg (YAN)

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

76.       Golden-breasted Puffleg (YAN)

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

77.       Booted Raquet-tail (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

78.       Black-tailed Trainbearer (CALI)

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

79.       Tyrian Metaltail (YAN)

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

80.       Violet-tailed Sylph (TBL, MIN)

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

81.       Wedge-billed Hummingbird (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

82.       Purple-crowned Fairy (PVM)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

83.       Purple-throated Woodstar (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

84.       Golden-headed Quetzal (UTV, TBL, NON)

X

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

85.       Chocó (White-eyed) Trogon (PVM, LB)

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

86.       Western White-tailed Trogon (PVM, 4R)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

87.       Masked Trogon (TBL, LB, UTV, MIN)

X

 

 

X

 

X

X

 

 

88.       Black-throated Trogon (4R)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

89.       Broad-billed Motmot (PVM, NON, LB, 4R)

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

X

X

90.       Rufous-tailed Jacamar (PVM)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

91.       Barred Puffbird [h] (LB)

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

92.       White-whiskered Puffbird (4R)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

93.       White-faced Nunbird (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

94.       Red-headed Barbet (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

95.       Toucan Barbet (TBL, UTV, NON) – NEAR THREATENED

X

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

96.       Crimson-rumped Toucanet (TBL, MIN)

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

97.       Pale-Mandibled Aracari – (PVM, LB, NON, 4R) Endemic, but not only to Chocó EBA

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

X

X

98.       Plate-billed Mountain-Toucan (UTV, NON) – NEAR THREATENED

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

99.       Chocó Toucan (PVM, LB)

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

100.    Chestnut-Mandibled Toucan (LB)

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

101.    Olivaceous Piculet [h] (PVM)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

102.    Crimson-mantled Woodpecker (TBL, NON)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

103.    Golden-olive Woodpecker (TBL, PVM, LB, NON)

X

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

X

104.    Lineated Woodpecker (PVM, LB)

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

105.    Black-cheeked Woodpecker (PVM, 4R)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

106.    Smoky-brown Woodpecker (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

107.    Red-rumped Woodpecker (PVM, 4R))

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

108.    Guyaquil Woodpecker (PVM, MIN) – NEAR THREATENED

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

 

109.    Powerful Woodpecker [h] (UTV)

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

110.    Crimson-bellied Woodpecker (PVM, 4R)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

111.    Pacific Hornero (PVM, MIN)

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

 

 

112.    Azara’s Spinetail (YAN, NON, UTV)

X

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

X

113.    Slaty Spinetail [h] (PVM)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

114.    Rufous Spinetail (UTV)

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

115.    Red-faced Spinetail (TBL, MIN)

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

  1. Streaked Tuftedcheek (NON)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

  1. Pearled Treerunner (UTV)

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

  1. Spotted Barbtail (TBL, MIN)

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

  1. Rusty-winged Barbtail (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Scaly-throated Foliage-Gleaner (LB, 4R)

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

X

 

  1. Western Woodhaunter [h] (4R)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Lineated Foliage-Gleaner (UTV, TBL, LB, NON)

X

 

 

X

 

 

X

 

X

  1. Buff-fronted Foliage-Gleaner (LB)

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Ruddy Foliage-Gleaner [h] (LB)

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Striped Treehunter (UTV)

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

  1. Plain Xenops (4R)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

  1. Tyrannine Woodcreeper (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Plain-brown Woodcreeper (PVM, NON, 4R)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

X

  1. Wedge-billed Woodcreeper (4R)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

  1. Strong-billed Woodcreeper (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Spotted Woodcreeper (PVM, TBL, 4R)

X

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

  1. Streak-headed Woodcreeper [h] (PVM)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Montane Woodcreeper (UTV, MIN, TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

X

X

 

 

  1. Uniform Antshrike (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Western Slaty-Antshrike (PVM, 4R)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

  1. Spot-crowned Antvireo (4R)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

  1. Pacific Streaked-Antwren (PVM)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. White-flanked Antwren (4R)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

  1. Slaty Antwren (TBL, LB)

X

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Dot-winged Antwren (4R)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

  1. Long-tailed Antbird (4R)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

  1. Chestnut-backed Antbird (PVM, 4R)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

X

 

  1. Immaculate Antbird (LB)

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Stub-tailed Antbird (PVM)

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Black-headed Antthrush (4R)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

  1. Rufous-breasted Antthrush [h] (TBL, LB)

X

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Undulated Antpitta [h] (YAN)

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Scaled Antpitta [h] (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Moustached Antpitta [h] (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Chestnut-crowned Antpitta [h] (TBL, NON)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

  1. Rufous Antpitta [h] (YAN)

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Tawny Antpitta [h] (YAN)

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Ochre-breasted Antpitta (TBL)

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Ash-colored Tapaculo (YAN)

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  1. Unicolore